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Nicole Atkins

Events

Date / Time Location  
Friday Jul 25, 2014 7:30PM The Mann Center Philadelphia, PA Buy Tickets More Info
Saturday Jul 26, 2014 8:00PM Celebrate Brooklyn Brooklyn, NY Buy Tickets More Info
Sunday Jul 27, 2014 8:00PM Hammerstein Ballroom New York City, NY Buy Tickets More Info
Tuesday Jul 29, 2014 8:00PM Masonic Temple Theatre Detroit, MI Buy Tickets More Info
Thursday Jul 31, 2014 8:00PM Sony Centre For The Performing Arts Toronto, ON Buy Tickets More Info

1 - 5 of 5 Events

Bio

The shores of New Jersey are littered, quite literally, with small towns whose better days are far in the past. They're towns that have been written about, and sung over; towns that have been...

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The shores of New Jersey are littered, quite literally, with small towns whose better days are far in the past. They're towns that have been written about, and sung over; towns that have been mythologized and idealized; and they are the towns that 28-year-old musician Nicole Atkins--a native of Neptune City, located a stones throw from fabled Asbury Park--was born and raised in. They can be places steeped in their own history, buried under the sense of their own pasts. Places of hey-days and what-once-was. And it's that sense of something lost, and of what perhaps should have been, and what might be, that permeates Atkins's debut, Neptune City. The characters in her tunes seem to live in an idealized past. "This record is the history of my town; it's the history of my family and friend in this town," she explains. "From the time I was a kid I started collecting these sad little tragically beautiful personal stories from the people in my life, and my own as well. That sense of history really appeals to me as an artist." These tales became her blue prints, her inspiration, that would become songs like "Maybe Tonight," a Ronnettes sounding traipse about a possible chance meeting, or "The Way It Is," a dark and haunting defense, an insistence by someone hell bent on finding out for herself that something might be wrong. But it might be right, too. The record calls to mind Roy Orbison if he were a woman; the bleak visions of Nick Cave and Leonard Cohen; the darkly mysterious girl group-on-acid musings of Julee Cruise and Lynch composer Angelo Badalamenti; the sorrow of Patsy Cline, the '60s experimentation of Love and Nuggets; all with a redeeming sense of hope amidst the emotional wreckage that is all Nicole. A sense that's perfectly captured on "Cool Enough," on which she sings, "I don't care where you're going/You're taking me with you/This place got nothing that I could want/But I think that someday, I might feel different/But still, that's someday/Still that's someday/So take me with you." Over everything, Atkins brings a painterly quality to her music, fitting for a woman who studied illustration while at UNC Charlotte, and still has her own mural business. Her songs are aural paintings, mixing and matching colors and sounds. In the end, Neptune City comes across as a restoration project in a way, an attempt to build something new on something old. There's an acute subtlety to the art of restoration. Do it wrong and you're simply cribbing the past. Do it right and you're actually, in a profound way, carrying it forward into today. And that's what Neptune City accomplishes. It brings its past with it, carries its heart on its sleeve, and strides hopefully into a better day it can hardly imagine, but hopes will be there nonetheless.